johndarnielle:

jockohomoremix:

Lost Andy Warhol Artworks Discovered on Amiga Floppies from the ’80s - First official rescue mission and subsequent unearthing of a contemporary artist’s work from an old computer (Amiga 1000). Thanks to the Carnegie Mellon University’s Computer Club and a team of artists, archivists and curators who were able to extract some of Warhol’s lost pixels into the physical world. I’m curious about the retrieval process which has been documented by a video crew from the Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) and will be premiering as Trapped: Andy Warhol’s Amiga Experiments on May 10th at the museum. If you can’t make it to the burgh’ you can check out the documentary on its website starting May 12th. * Featured above, Andy Warhol with Debbie Harry at the 1985 Amiga Launch at Lincoln Center

dormant technologies are still your best entertainment value across all artistic disciplines

johndarnielle:

jockohomoremix:

Lost Andy Warhol Artworks Discovered on Amiga Floppies from the ’80s - First official rescue mission and subsequent unearthing of a contemporary artist’s work from an old computer (Amiga 1000). Thanks to the Carnegie Mellon University’s Computer Club and a team of artists, archivists and curators who were able to extract some of Warhol’s lost pixels into the physical world. I’m curious about the retrieval process which has been documented by a video crew from the Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) and will be premiering as Trapped: Andy Warhol’s Amiga Experiments on May 10th at the museum. If you can’t make it to the burgh’ you can check out the documentary on its website starting May 12th.

* Featured above, Andy Warhol with Debbie Harry at the 1985 Amiga Launch at Lincoln Center

dormant technologies are still your best entertainment value across all artistic disciplines

narwhal-noir:

I took my girlfriend to an improv show the other night and during intermission we were passionately arguing over whether half a 5 Hour Energy shot would give you 2.5 hours of energy or 5 hours of half-assed energy so we turned around to ask the opinions of the three people behind us and one of them said “Are all your arguments like this because we heard you in the lobby earlier fighting over the right way to pronounce ‘egg’?”

If someone can be kicked out of school for copying a paper, a person should be kicked out of school for raping another human being.

Wagatwe Wanjuki, UVM Dismantling Rape Culture Conference 2014  (via thewastedgeneration)

daffodilwords:

anogoodrabblerouser:

The odds of being attacked by a shark in the US are 1 in 11,500,000, but no one gets mad at people who want to avoid the ocean.

The odds of a woman being sexually assaulted in her lifetime are 1 in 6, but if she doesn’t feel safe around strange men she’s a stereotyping bitch.

Strange old world we live in.

BOOM MOTHERFUCKER

edgebug:


"The men in the room suddenly realized that they didn’t want to know her better. She was beautiful, but she was beautiful in the way a forest fire was beautiful: something to be admired from a distance, not up close.” ― Neil Gaiman

—and Terry Pratchett. The quote is from Good Omens. And it’s describing War. As in the horseman (woman) of the Apocalypse.
And I am SO down for anything comparing Natasha Romanoff to War.
Zoom Info
edgebug:


"The men in the room suddenly realized that they didn’t want to know her better. She was beautiful, but she was beautiful in the way a forest fire was beautiful: something to be admired from a distance, not up close.” ― Neil Gaiman

—and Terry Pratchett. The quote is from Good Omens. And it’s describing War. As in the horseman (woman) of the Apocalypse.
And I am SO down for anything comparing Natasha Romanoff to War.
Zoom Info
edgebug:


"The men in the room suddenly realized that they didn’t want to know her better. She was beautiful, but she was beautiful in the way a forest fire was beautiful: something to be admired from a distance, not up close.” ― Neil Gaiman

—and Terry Pratchett. The quote is from Good Omens. And it’s describing War. As in the horseman (woman) of the Apocalypse.
And I am SO down for anything comparing Natasha Romanoff to War.
Zoom Info
edgebug:


"The men in the room suddenly realized that they didn’t want to know her better. She was beautiful, but she was beautiful in the way a forest fire was beautiful: something to be admired from a distance, not up close.” ― Neil Gaiman

—and Terry Pratchett. The quote is from Good Omens. And it’s describing War. As in the horseman (woman) of the Apocalypse.
And I am SO down for anything comparing Natasha Romanoff to War.
Zoom Info
edgebug:


"The men in the room suddenly realized that they didn’t want to know her better. She was beautiful, but she was beautiful in the way a forest fire was beautiful: something to be admired from a distance, not up close.” ― Neil Gaiman

—and Terry Pratchett. The quote is from Good Omens. And it’s describing War. As in the horseman (woman) of the Apocalypse.
And I am SO down for anything comparing Natasha Romanoff to War.
Zoom Info
edgebug:


"The men in the room suddenly realized that they didn’t want to know her better. She was beautiful, but she was beautiful in the way a forest fire was beautiful: something to be admired from a distance, not up close.” ― Neil Gaiman

—and Terry Pratchett. The quote is from Good Omens. And it’s describing War. As in the horseman (woman) of the Apocalypse.
And I am SO down for anything comparing Natasha Romanoff to War.
Zoom Info

edgebug:

"The men in the room suddenly realized that they didn’t want to know her better. She was beautiful, but she was beautiful in the way a forest fire was beautiful: something to be admired from a distance, not up close.” ― Neil Gaiman
—and Terry Pratchett. The quote is from Good Omens. And it’s describing War. As in the horseman (woman) of the Apocalypse.

And I am SO down for anything comparing Natasha Romanoff to War.

protego-et-servio:

Is Abortion Murder?

A frequent mantra around pro-life circles is: “Abortion is murder!” Or something similar. It’s a fallacy that uses emotional manipulation as its foundation.

First, we need to discuss the differences between human, human being, and person. “There’s a difference?” you ask.  Yes, there is. They work as synonyms, but the debate on abortion needs us to dissect each term for clear discussion.

Human is the biological identification of our species.

Human being is the state of “being human,” which is very similar, if not synonymous, with person. What does it mean to be a human, however? What separates us – or used to separate us – from animals? Our level of sentience. Our empathy for each other, our interactions with the world at large, our perceptions are encompassed by the term “person” (I avoid using human being, and generally stick to human and person for terminology in discussion).

Now, murder versus abortion:

Murder is a legal term, so let us look at the legal definition: the killing of a human being by a sane person, with intent, malice aforethought (prior intention to kill the particular victim or anyone who gets in the way) and with no legal excuse or authority.

There are various parts to this definition:

  • the killing of a human being
  • malice
  • aforethought
  • no legal excuse / authority

In order for abortion to be murder, it needs to meet those qualifications.

Is abortion the killing of a human being?

As previously discussed, human being is “being human.” While abortion is the killing of a human, is it truly the killing of a human being? No. In order to be a human being, you’re presenting qualities that make you human (like sentience), and fetuses are not sentient. Thus, the death of a fetus is the death of a human, but is it the death of a person? No.

Is abortion done out of malice?

No. People get abortion for a plethora of reasons, but no one gets abortion out of spite for the fetus.

Is abortion done with aforethought?

Yes. Abortion needs to be scheduled, since it’s an operation.

Is abortion done without legal excuse or authority?

No. A pregnant person has complete legal authority over their own body. The fetus, not being a person, has no rights. Even if a fetus was considered a person, they have have no right to use a person’s body without explicit, ongoing consent. Once the pregnant person rescinds consent, the fetus has no rights to use the pregnant person.

In short, abortion is not murder. Why is “murder” used by the pro-life movement, instead of more accurate terms? “Murder” is an emotional gut punch. No one wants to be a murderer; it has a sharp, evil connotation, which furthers stigma against abortion.

This stigma against abortion is unforgivable. It keeps people from seeking abortion when they need or want one. It keeps people from healing after abortion. It keeps people miserable, guilt-ridden, and ashamed. Anyone, and any organization, that perpetuates a stigma against abortion hurts the people who have had or who will have abortions. It’s sadistic and cruel to perpetuate this stigma.